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Tuesday, August 26, 2008

BOCC seeks more time to deliberate
on Log Hill Mesa communications tower

Submitted for the approval or disapproval before the Ouray County Commissioners: the dead zones.
They are wild places so horrendously unqualified for all types of cutting edge communications devices that every branch of the region's law enforcement and emergency personnel appeared before the commissioners Monday, during a lively hearing on a controversial cell phone tower on Log Hill Mesa near Ridgway to bray, like coyotes, to the mutual chorus: Can you hear me now?
"When radios don't work it's hard for deputies to do their jobs," said Ouray County Sheriff Dominic Mattivi. "We've had calls where our deputies are out their and nobody can hear their cells."
Added Norm Rooker, chief of emergency services for Ouray County: "This is (about saving) lives. These are your lives. This system is costing you, the citizens, nothing."
By teaming up for a governmental/corporate partnership to pay for the 80-foot tower, to be built by Black & Veatch for the communications giant, Verizon, on land occupied by the Dallas Creek Water Company within Unit 1 of the Log Hill Village subdivision, a partnership has been created to build a $720,000 that the county could never, otherwise, afford.
"We have somebody willing to pony up at zero cost to the taxpayers," Rooker said.
On the other side of the more than two-hour debate Monday was the not-in-my-backyard crowd, mostly residents of the pricey community living on the mesa that is afforded breathtaking vistas of the San Juans, Mount Sneffles, and therefore, the rigid cascades serving as a backdrop for the Ralph Lauren Ranch.
Their broadcast before the commissioners: Most people are in favor of improving communications for the region, but why does it have to be in this neighborhood, especially one with such a picturesque setting?
"We are concerned about the current proposed tower's visual impacts," said Jane Nash of the Ridgway/Ouray Community Council. "We are in support of the tower, but not in a residential area."
Indeed, the specter of the possibility of an 80-foot communications tower on the mesa has now become a lightning rod for a baffling question over the wireless, highly microwaveable settlement of this high-profile corner of the New West.
While an attorney for the Log Hill Village Home & Property Owners' Association, Bob Thomas, argued that if it had been a simple development proposal before the commissioners, it ever would have been been considered for approval, the president of the HOA, Reggie Kajer, plead for the entire process to be slowed down so all viewpoints can be considered.
"The proposal for this 80-foot tower ... that we have to approve it now or everybody is going to die is wrong," he said. "I think we all should have been talking about this a year ago, and I think that's the problem."
It generated so much commentary during Monday's meeting in Ridgway, the commissioners didn't even have time to deliberate on what they heard. Instead, it moved to continue the decision on what had originally appeared to have been a slam dunk for a special meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 2, again in Ridgway at the 4-H Event Center.
Even before the list of 23 people who asked to speak began offering their comments, Commissioner Heidi Albritton could see the writing on the wall: that no approvals would be made during this week's meeting.
"I don't want to open up Pandora's box, but Pandora may be already out and about," she predicted before the public hearing portion of the meeting attended by approximately 60 people.
The delay was especially necessary considering the fact that, at the center of the debate, a mushy center had arisen in the form of a bit of a somewhat baffling administrative oversight. Included in the debate now is the question about what exactly the commissioners should base their ruling on regarding the nature of the “structure” versus “edifice” in terms of how it was to be interpreted in county's land use code.
At the end of the public hearing, Commissioner Keith Meinert told those in attendance that the semantics over the official "definition of structure" would be reviewed.
Prior to the meeting, the commissioners simply had to rubber stamp a recommendation for approval, by a 5-2 vote, of the Rigway Area Joint Planning Board. But now the commissioners find themselves looking at a complex question of values in which public safety and issues of visual impact would have to be weighed, and, quite possibly vivisected.
"I assure you, you have given us something to think about," Meinert said.
-- Douglas McDaniel, staff writer, Ridgway Sun

Thursday, July 24, 2008

Mythville Goes On the Record About Recreate '68

Tuesday, July 22, 2008




Where is Technology Heading in 2008?

To Turn the World Into One Big Tool to Save Itself, That's Where


By Douglas McDaniel
Mythville MetaMedia

Where is technology going? Well, you could ask a number of people in all fields, and you’d likely get a different answer, although the color green, implying nature and more fire with less fuel for yet another revolution, something akin to instantaneous science fiction, as the world slowly moves from monoculture to permaculture, would be the most common synthesis of what people are thinking.
If you asked the person who knew something, quite a bit actually, about technology who had gone away for a while to enter the new city of glittering lights, they would nonethless be inclined to refer to it more in terms of the clash upon their ears. The unbearble noise. The glare, the lights, the strangeness of things. And of course, the smell.
Or you could ask the person living in such a place as Denver with little technology other than a cell phone. If they are lucky. If they are not members of the dispossessed in the long-promised, ever widening digital divide. They might say it’s all they need, that cell phone. But that one thing is being used to try to attain all they really need: such as a job or a way to reach so and so to score such and such ...
You could speak to someone who knows everything about technology in the 21st century. However, they might be difficult to understand since in all likelihood their speech will sound like Martian.
Clearly, better, clearer ways of communication are needed. Efficiency in every category, more Promethean fire with less fuel, machines that think and think green, are needed. They could run by their own volition so man can return to some semblance of balance and spiritual, creative and sustainable growth. The new hunger for tech is headed now in that direction, too, as many of the old alchemical questions are not how to turn the lead into gold, but the gold into soul.
But during a political season and the possibilities of an intensified global war loom, the crystal ball is muddy at best. Or so it seems. If one tries to predict the future by looking at history, you end up with some pretty good answers about where technology is headed.
For example, seasons of militarism have always been the leading edge of technology. The world wide web itself was built for those very same reasons.
Meanwhile, the counter force of cyberwar, disinformation and surveillance are surely the factors to be most felt by the consumer and refugee under such dystopian conditions. Other than the bombs, themselves, that is, more likely delivered by soldiers with laptops than those with guns, we can just trust in the knowledge that the art of war will improve.
Where is technology going? Look at those who developed the web, the brains, the geeks, if you will. Twenty five years ago, when the academic-based internet was being built, it was Dungeons and Dragons players who were leading the way.
Today you could ask them and they would point you to one of their 500 social networking links, perhaps one titled, “13 Aspects of Technology, all of it leading to improved Techno-pop-gnosticism.” Then, they would try to explain the 37 more technolopolitical “proto-psychic stages” to follow. They’d say: “It’s all leading to the planet becoming one quantum, quite convergent tool ... always coming together, then falling apart, but why, despite all of our web hits and faster, ever faster need and desire and ability to get our kicks with just one click, we still don’t know. Perhaps, we know even less, now. Despite our best efforts and examinations and experiments. But, no worries. If the bee in the hive doesn’t know why it makes honey, why should we?”
Or you could ask someone in business, who works B-to-B, who is entrenched in every conceivable technology. However, they would likely not have the time, since they are so busy (to coin a phrase that inspired Google.com) pouring water endlessly into broken vases, trying to keep all of the fires burning. They might be more inclined to simply let go of technology for at least a few days, to enjoy things that either have nothing to do with technology at all, but are, like a fine old motorcycle, quite beautiful as old-tech. Like a simple fire in a fireplace. Or, better yet, in the woods, testing their varying degrees of ability, among those in the group, to remember, exactly, how it’s done.
Of course, most employed people don’t have that kind of luxury these days, as the global situation is calling for increased time keeping the global technology wheel spinning. But trying to maintain the current dependency on the status quo of the monotechnoculture is clearly folly. Looking at it on this date, all we really know that everything could change in a blink of the eye. Because, during the time you read this, it actually did.
Just today, there is a story about a new building, a tall one, that “defies gravity.” Meanwhile, somebody, somewhere is developing a new kind of snowboard to defy gravity better.
But the real word on technology street is about war, not of the usual kind, but the global war to turn all new tech toward fighting the battle of man against nature. A long slow hard struggle to turn the Titanic around. That is, to save the planet. According to a world-class scientific panel put together by the United Nations, the human race can now start enjoying the last days of the ski industry, for example, like the last days of disco.
Right down to the rapidly escalating decrease of snow in the mountains. Word on the streets of science is global warming and its effects are so well past being recognized, it’s no longer hip to say it’s so, Joe. The environmentalists, then, the greens, can keep doing good works, sure, but otherwise, go into transition mode. Intractable positions can now be transformed into a simple “do no harm, but allow for existing energy-alternatives- development” mode.
Time to reassess, to pat yourself on the back. The environmentalists managed to get even the biggest idiots to listen, and their online savvy played a big part. But now what’s need is not to assign guilt, but action. What we are looking at now isn’t convincing everyone trees need to be preserved for mere aesthetic values, but that the ethic now is the avoidance of the global warming effects leading to a red line event, as in mass extinction.
That is now actually the task at hand, according to the word on the streets of pure science.
That’s right. We got the “asteroid is going to get hit us” notice from the U.N., from NASA, from everyone, including Exxon. I say “notice” because this is the part of the movie about human history where Bruce Willis gets drafted, after initially refusing the call, as all film heroes do, and says, “OK, I’ll do it, I’ll join the world army to save the planet using the best of all available technology.”
The local emergency management response for any responsible adult should now include a list for a few things. First, you need to make some sort of announcement to your kids. Tell them “Sorry, we all have to join this world science army, or we are cooked. If we all stopped driving our cars today, if we even stopped heating our trophy home, stopped doing all of the things that made it happen, the effects of the greenhouse gases as they currently exist is enough to raise the seas by almost five feet and turn your futures as video-rock star dandies playing at a venue at any town on earth with a dock and a bay into a precarious – yes, sadly, it’s true my sweeties – impossibility.”
Tell them sorry, sorry, sorry. Tell them, “Sorry but, you beautiful little eagles, it’s time to put the video game down and get back to your physics and engineering and mathematics studies so that you can, as soon as possible, make some horrendous choices in global energy needs, such as gas-fired and nuclear power plants, safer and more efficient for human survival.”
Tell them to go outside and invent something fun, like an airborne nanotech methane eater to make the world sky-woes go away.
Tell them the days of such pleasantries as gravity games are over. Meet the new hip: Wind. Storm. Fire. Drought. Disaster. Catastrophe in cascades … you get the picture. Give them good survival tips for a future world that will feel a little like Venus and Mars, but it can’t decide.
In Colorado, for example, where we sit on enough resources to turn the country into Western Arabia for the plundering of lodes of natural gas and uranium, resisting the trend is not just difficult, if not impossible – to resist is an act of global irresponsibility.
It’s a hell of a thing to get one’s mind around, this paradigm shift of what will be necessary for human survival, but you only have a few days to think it through, tops. Then, soon as you can, pack up the Hummer, drive it out to your nearest drilling rig, and see if there’s anything you can do to make it more efficient, cleaner, better. Say here, have one of our extra Thanksgiving turkeys, all cooked at the necessary temperatures in our big ass ovens. Tell the gas rig workers, “Thanks, next time we come around, we’ll bring you something nice from the Salvation Army store.” Invite them to stay, when they get world-weary as the hours get longer and the daily temperature averages continue to rise, in one of the bazillion rooms of your trophy homes for the weekend.
Tell them, “Sorry, sorry, sorry. We’ll stay out of the way of your siphoning of the earth. Just, in this century, could you be a little more Zen about it? OK, great, thanks. Good luck saving the planet for the rest of us.”
Then it will be OK to ski and dance, a little, I hope. We’ll see how it all looks with the guns and technowledgy gods and cannons during the next big American Revolution in 2012, when it will be yet another time to re-define under great pressure. When we get another big check on the earth, the sky, the seas and all of our technology. When we can look at our tools, our responsible uses for fire, always a dangerous trick for mankind for 10,000 or more years, asking ourselves, did this tool work? Why or why not? Then start that big wheel turning, hopefully by this time without any fuel needed at all, again. For the next generation. A perpetual motion machine that benefits with a beneficial campfire glow for not just one, but all things, all day, and especially, night.

Tuesday, July 04, 2006

23 Roads to Mythville
An apocalyptic journey across America and meditation on the imposition of order in space, both cyber and dirt real. By experiential author Douglas McDaniel, who explores the mysteries of American networked life. Read more



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Ipswich at War
A few days after Sept. 11, 2001, poet and essayist Douglas McDaniel moved to Ipswich, on the North Shore of Massachusetts. A collection of poems from that period of fear and anxiety, as well as the polemic essay, "Media Arts and War."
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Glasnost Lost
As an act of defiance after the botched election of 2000, experiential author launched himself into a journey into the underworld of American life, or, what he calls: The Science of Descent. Read more



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Godz, Cars & Cannon
Experiential author Douglas McDaniel launches drives into the networked thickets of American life, looking for signs of myth and romance in the age of automotive machines.
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Many Moons the Mythville: The Collected Road Poems
Poetry written during a 10-year span of criss-crossing America in a roving-eye view of the turn-of-the-century landscape of Mythville, or, as the author puts it: "It's all a bunch of Mythville." With work from four separate books by Arizona-based author and poet Douglas McDaniel, the bard-inspired voices of Milton, Blake and Yeats, as well as the saturnine streak of early beat poesy, ring through this collection of poems and essays. From the southwestern deserts to the Atlantic and Pacific Coasts, "Many Moons to Mythville" is a foot-to-the-floor blast through the mythical roads of American life.
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Human Search Engine

The journey continues as the quest for myth in an age of information overload leads to online life as an editor for Access Internet Magazine. A story about all human search engines as they chase the ghost in the machine.
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William Blake in Cyberspace

Experiential author Douglas McDaniel takes on the visionary art and poetry of William Blake, comparing an otherworldly worldview to that revolutionary, romantic era to our own wild, wired, mythic world.
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The Kachina's Son

Poems about the Four Corners area written while author Douglas McDaniel was living in Telluride, Colorado.
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The Road to Mythville
A collection of poems on the new millennium in America, drawing from decade of bouncing across the country as a journalist and Kerouac-style poet, from the Southwestern deserts to the shores of New England and back again.
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Tuesday, April 18, 2006


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http://solar-heliospheric.engin.umich.edu/hjenning/RecentEvents.html

Recent Solar Events
Here you will find a record of some of the things that have been taking place more recently in and around our Sun.  Enjoy!
Warning!  The animations on this page may have long loading times.  Be prepared to wait if connected by modem.  (They're worth the wait!)
***This will be the last entry on the Recent Solar Events page because the author is moving away. For another source of recent solar events, go to Spaceweather.com where up to date information is provided. Goodbye!***
August 1-4, 2002
An unexpected geomagnetic storm stuck over the weekend, causing amazing aurorae across the country. I was flying from Pittsburgh, PA to Providence, RI late Friday night and saw some myself! I didn't have a camera ready though, so this images (from MI) will have to do.
Click here to see an image of the aurora.
July 26-28, 2002
There are a large amount of sunspots on the Sun at the moment, and a CME was released near one of them this past Friday. It is not directly coming for Earth, but some of the ejection is headed our way. There is a possibility for aurorae today (Monday). Be on the lookout!
Click here for an animation of the CME.
July 19-20, 2002
A coronal mass ejection that swept past Earth on the 19th caused some beautif5ul aurora, seen especially in Canada. Another eruption was released on July 20th, causing strong radio blackouts across North America and the Pacific.
Click here to see an image of the weekend's aurora.
Click here to see an animation of the CME from the 20th.
June 9, 2002
There was a unusually beautiful prominence that came from the Sun on Sunday that was bigger than the size of 50 Earths lined up end to end! Also, there will be a partial solar eclipse tonight when the Moon moves in front of our Sun. Remember never to stare directly at the Sun!
Click here for an image of the prominence from Sunday.
May 22-23, 2002
A CME swept past Earth early this morning, and we are in an intense geomagnetic storm. The CME left the Sun yesterday and is actually what is called a "cannibal coronal mass ejection " because it was a combination of three CMEs that fired very quickly. Look out for an aurora or two on Thursday or Friday night. We will also be entering a solar wind stream soon, stay tuned for details.
Click here for an animation of the CME.
May 16-18, 2002
A CME swept past the Earth this past Saturday, triggering a storm that lasted for about 12 hours. There were aurorae seen in northern Europe, Canada, and the New England area of the U.S.
Click here for an animation of the CME.
May 11, 2002
An interplanetary shock wave stimulated a geomagnetic storm on Saturday, causing aurorae to explode throughout the sky.
April 17-21, 2002
A CME swept past Earth on the 17th, which caused a geomagnetic storm that raged for 12 hours. Another CME left the Sun on the 17th, and reached Earth on the 19th, intensifying as time went on. Aurorae were plentiful, and were seen as far south as California and Arizona. A solar flare erupted on the 21st, causing another CME to unveil from the Sun, possibly reaching us on the 22nd or 23rd.
Click here for an animation of the CME and an image of an aurora from the 17th.
Click here to see an image of the solar flare and the CME animation from the 21st.
April 15, 2002
A CME billowed from the Sun, possibly causing Northern lights within the next week.
March 31, 2002
Earth entered a high-speed solar wind stream coming from a coronal hole, making aurorae a possibility for this weekend in higher latitudes.
Click here for an image of the coronal hole, taken three days earlier.
March 15, 2002
An explosion on the Sun hurled a coronal mass ejection toward Earth late on the 15th.
February 20-21, 2002
Some sunspots erupted on these days, producing solar flares and a CME coming in our direction. Look for aurorae, especially at high latitudes, on Friday and Saturday this weekend, when the CME will be reaching our planet.
Click here for an animation of the CME.
January 4, 2002
One of the more beautiful CMEs ever seen burst from the Sun on Friday. It was quite a sight despite the fact that it did not come near Earth.
Click here to see an animation of the CME.
January 1, 2002
A CME billowed away from the Sun on New Year's Day. Although it wasn't heading for our planet, an aurora was produced.
Click here to see an animation of the CME.
Click here to see an image of the aurora.
December 26-28, 2001
An explosion from the Sun triggered a solar proton storm around the planet. It wasn't directly heading toward our planet, however, and so it missed us. On the 28th, another explosion came forth from an active region on the Sun.
December 14-15, 2001
Look out for a solar eclipse today, Friday the 14th, that will be visible all over North America! Also, there is solar activity headed our way as a sunspot erupted on Thursday the 13th. Look out for aurorae today and tomorrow.
Click here for an animation of the eruption.
November 24-25, 2001
A pair of CMEs buffeted Earth on Saturday, causing aurorae to be seen as far south as Arkansas! A solar flare was also released on the 25th, but no CME resulted from it.
Click here to see an animation of the aurora.
November 4, 2001
A solar explosion sparked a huge solar flare, causing a CME to be ejected from the Sun. It reached Earth on the 6th UT time (or about 8:50 PM on the 5th EST time). Aurorae were seen all over, even in middle and southern latitudes. I personally was able to see an aurora myself for the first time in years! The storm is subsiding now.
Click here to see an image of the aurora (taken in Michigan!)
Click here to see an image of the CME that caused all of this activity.
October 25, 2001
A solar flare erupted and caused a CME to billow toward Earth. It is expected to reach us on the 27th or 28th. Keep a lookout for aurora!
Click here to see an animation of the CME.
October 19-22, 2001
A large solar flare was released on this Friday morning due to an eruption of twisted magnetic fields , causing radio blackouts through Asia and Australia. A CME was also released. The results reached Earth on the 21st. Meanwhile on the 22nd, another pair of CMEs exploded and are expected to reach Earth on the 24th or 25th. Aurora will be possible, especially if the second CME overtakes the first.
Click here to see animations of both the solar flare and the CME .
Click here to see an image of the aurora.
Click here to see an animation of the CME from the 22nd.
October 9-11, 2001
A CME erupted from the Sun and swept past the Earth on Thursday, the 11th. Keep a lookout for Northern lights in the days ahead.
Click here for an animation of the CME.
September 30-October 1, 2001
Some of the most beautiful aurora seen this aurora season were visible on the nights of the 30th and the 1st, due to a pair of disturbances in the solar wind that reached our Earth. A CME left the Sun on the 1st also, leaving us in the midst of a radiation storm.
Click here to for an image of one of the weekend's aurorae.
Click here for an animation of the CME .
September 23-25, 2001
A solar wind disturbance swept past the Earth on Sunday, the 23rd, triggering a geomagnetic storm. Meanwhile, a solar flare erupted Monday morning releasing a CME that reached the Earth on Tuesday. Another solar flare erupted on Tuesday also, but is not expected to affect our Earth.
Click here to see an image of the aurorae seen on the 23rd.
Click here to see the CME that was released on the 24th.
August 25-28, 2001
The most powerful solar flare since April erupted, causing radio blackouts in places all over the world. It also released a huge CME which hit the Earth on the 27th. There is a chance of an aurora being spotted in high latitudes tonight around local midnight.
Click here to see an animation of the CME.
August 14-20, 2001
A solar filament collapsed on the Sun causing a CME to be released which struck on the 17th. A 12 hour geomagnetic storm took place and aurorae was seen.
Click here for an animation of the CME.
Click here for an image of the aurora.
August 10, 2001
A CME was released on the 9th that may reach our Earth this weekend. An aurora may be visible over the weekend, around local midnight on Saturday and Sunday. There was also a solar wind gust coming from a coronal hole that will reach Earth on Sunday. Stay tuned to the sky, especially if you are at high latitudes!
Click here for an animation of the CME.
August 6, 2001
Although there hasn't been much solar activity going on lately, there are no three sunspots on the side of the Sun facing the Earth. Also, on the morning of the 5th, a solar wind stream reached our Earth's magnetosphere . The full moon made it difficult to see any aurorae.
June 21, 2001
A solar eclipse was visible in southern Africa, where thousands of eclipse-chasing onlookers watched.
Click here to see an image of the eclipse.
June 15-20, 2001
A geomagnetic storm takes place after a CME left the Sun on the 15th. It was not heading toward the Sun, but the bow shock caused the storm. The number of sunspots is also up. This caused the northern lights to appear on the 18th. Another three CMEs left the Sun on the 20th!
Click here to see an animation of the three CMEs.
Click here to see an animation of the CME.
Click here to see an image of the lights.
May 12-13, 2001
On the 12th, our planet entered a high-speed solar wind stream causing a small geomagnetic storm that continued minimally through the 13th. Also on the 13th, a CME left the Sun.
Click here to see an animation of the event.
April 26-28, 2001
A CME hurled into space on Thursday the 26th, striking Earth on Saturday the 28th and creating a small storm.
Click here to see an amimation of the event.
April 15-18, 2001
A solar flare, similar in power to the one from the 2nd, erupted on Easter, but fortunately the explosion was directed away from Earth. We still saw some activity though, as a shock wave hit Earth on the night of the 17th. Aurora was seen throughout North America.
Click here to see an image of the aurora.
April 10-13, 2001
Two different CMEs came together to create havoc this week, with radio blackouts and radiation storms. They reached our Earth on the 11th causing beautiful aurorae, especially in Europe. Another solar flare exploded on the 12th, sending more activity our way that reached our planet on Friday the 13th.
Click here to see an animation of the CME from the 10th.
Click here to see the aurora.
April 6-9, 2001
On Friday the 6th, a CME was ejected into space, joining another one that was already on its way to the planet. The first one, which struck Saturday the 7th, did not have much effect, but the second one which struck Sunday the 8th, created a geomagnetic storm.
April 4, 2001
Although most of the material released from the flare on Monday was directed away from the Earth, some still made it to our magnetosphere today. There will be some activity, but not as much as what took place on March 31st.
April 2, 2001
The biggest solar flare in 12 years erupted from the Sun on the 2nd! Fortunately, most of the material released was facing away from Earth, but there was still an ongoing solar storm taking place around our planet. Also, the huge sunspot that appeared recently is slowly shrinking and will soon disappear.
Click here to see an animation of the massive CME that resulted from the flare.
March 28-April 1, 2001
All kinds of crazy stuff going on with the Sun these days! One of the largest sunspots in 10 years appeared on the disk , having the surface area of 13 Earths! A coronal mass ejection erupted near it on the 28th. It arrived at Earth on Friday, the 30th, causing a storm that lasted over 24 hours and created what has been called perhaps the most beautiful aurorae of the solar cycle ! Some was seen as far south as Mexico! Another CME (coronal mass ejection) left the Sun on Sunday, the 1st.
Click here to see an animation of the sunspot moving over the disk.
Click here to see an image of the aurora taken on the 31st.
Click here to see an animation of the CME that left the Sun on the 1st.
March 25, 2001
A coronal mass ejection left the sun on the 25th, and the Earth was buffeted by it the morning of the 27th.
Click here to see an animation from the 25th.
March 19-22, 2001
A coronal mass ejection reached the Earth on the morning of the 19th and continued to cause activity well into the 20th. Aurorae was seen as far south as New York! Another ejection left the Sun after a filament collapsed the 19th and reached the Earth on the 22nd, causing more beautiful aurorae.
Click here to see an animation of the ejection that hit the Earth on the 19th.
Click here to see an image of the aurora from the 19th.
February 28, 2001
Although sunspots are at their lowest level in three months, a filament collapsed on the Sun and sent a coronal mass ejection toward the Earth. The impact reached the Earth on March 3rd, causing faint aurorae at high latitudes on the darker side of the planet. The sunspot number appears to be on the rise again.
Click here to see an animation of the event.
February 15, 2001
A coronal mass ejection raced away from the Sun and was expected to reach the Earth over the weekend. It did not, however. It was most likely a backside event, meaning that it was really heading away from us. In more exciting news, our Sun's magnetic field just recently made its "flip" to the peak of solar maximum , as it has completed half of its solar cycle. By 2012, it will have made it back to the peak of solar minimum !
Click here to see an animation of the ejection.
Click here to learn more about the solar cycle.
February 11-13, 2001
A coronal mass ejection left the Sun early on the morning of the 11th, and let loose some Earth-bound material. This material caused solar disturbances early in the morning on the 13th that lasted until 9 AM. An aurora could have been seen at high latitudes.
Click here to see a zoom shot of the event.
January 28, 2001
A coronal mass ejection erupted from the Sun following a solar flare. No aurora was seen.
Click here to see an image of the eruptions.
January 23, 2001
The shock wave from the ejections that released on the 20th hit the Earth early in the morning, around 5 AM Eastern time. Geomagnetic activity did not reach high levels, but some aurorae were seen.
Click here to see an image taken of the aurora.
January 20, 2001
Two solar flares and a pair of coronal mass ejections left the Sun.  The solar material was expected to reach the Earth late on the 22nd or 23rd. 
Click here to see an animation of the two ejections.
January 10-14, 2001
On January 10, a solar flare eruption caused a coronal mass ejection to go billowing away from the Sun.  This caused an interplanetary shock wave to hit the Earth's magnetosphere early Saturday morning, January 13.  Although the conditions were favorable for aurora, the geomagnetic activity was not extensive.  On January 14, the collapse of a prominence caused another coronal mass ejection to take place, but this one was directed away from the Earth, so geomagnetic activity was unlikely.
Click here to see animations from the eruptions on the two days.
December 25, 2000
A Christmas Day solar eclipse.  The eclipse was only partial, so depending on where it was viewed, the area of the Sun covered varied from 60 to 20%.  The last solar eclipse on Christmas Day was in 1954, and the next one will be in 2307.  There are at least two solar eclipses a year, with five being the most occuring in one year.  (This is extremely rare.)
Click here to see an animation of the solar eclipse.
 
December 18, 2000
A solar flare erupted from the Sun in the early morning and was followed by a coronal mass ejection.  This ejection hit the Earth's magnetosphere on December 21, 2000, causing the interplanetary magnetic field to turn southward .
 
November 11, 2000
A solar storm similar to the one that took place on July 14, 2000.  An extremely powerful solar flare erupted on November 8th, reaching the Earth on November 9th. The coronal mass ejection that follwed the flare hit the Earth's magnetosphere on November 10th, leaving the Earth in a high velocity solar wind stream through November 11th.
Click here to see an animation from the 8th and the 9th.
 
July 14, 2000
The biggest solar storm since October 1989 took place at about dawn.  Eruptions were also spotted two days before that, on July 12th and 13th.
Click here to see an animation of the eruptions from the three days.

Tuesday, October 25, 2005


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Tue, 25 Oct 2005 14:10:09 GMT
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Half of Coral Reefs Could Be Destroyed (AP)
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ap/20051025/coral_reef_destruction
Tue, 25 Oct 2005 14:10:09 GMT
AP - Nearly half of the world's coral reefs may be lost in the next 40 years unless urgent measures are taken to protect them against the threat of climate change, according to a new report released Tuesday by the World Conservation Union.

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Global Warming Sparks Increased Plant Production in Arctic Lakes (SPACE.com / LiveScience.com)
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space/20051024/globalwarmingsparksincreasedplantproductioninarcticlakes
Mon, 24 Oct 2005 17:00:19 GMT
SPACE.com / LiveScience.com - Biological activity in some Arctic lakes has ratcheted up dramatically over the past 150 years as a result of global warming, according to a new study.

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EU launches new measures to protect seas, oceans (Reuters)
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nm/20051024/environment_eu_oceans_dc
Mon, 24 Oct 2005 16:19:24 GMT
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An aerial view of the Pacific Ocean near the uninhabited Minami Iwojima Island, about 870 miles south of Tokyo, July 3, 2005. Climate change, oil spills and commercial fishing have put oceans and seas at risk, driving the EU's executive branch to launch new measures to clean up and protect waters surrounding the European Union. (Japan Coast Guard/Handout/Reuters)Reuters - Climate change, oil spills and
commercial fishing have put oceans and seas at risk, driving
the EU's executive branch to launch new measures to clean up
and protect waters surrounding the European Union.




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(Reuters)

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Australia wins praise for Great Barrier Reef protection plan (AFP)
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Mon, 24 Oct 2005 05:06:30 GMT
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- The Wistari and Herron Reefs in the Great Barrier Reef off Australia's northeastern coast. Australia, a frequent target of criticism from environmentalists for refusing to ratify the Kyoto Protocol on global warming, received the World Wildlife Fund's (WWF) top accolade for its efforts to protect the Great Barrier Reef(AFP/File)AFP - Australia, a frequent target of criticism from environmentalists for refusing to ratify the Kyoto Protocol on global warming, received the World Wildlife Fund's (WWF) top accolade for its efforts to protect the Great Barrier Reef.



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(AFP)

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Global Warming a Major Threat to Africa (AP)
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Fri, 21 Oct 2005 23:38:09 GMT
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- This undated file photo supplied by Ohio State University shows the Furtwangler ice wall on Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, whose glaciers are rapidly retreating. The potential consequences of global warming could be devastating for the world's poorest continent, international experts warned at a conference on climate change wrapping up in South Africa, Thursday Oct. 20, 2005.   (AP Photo/ Professor Lonnie Thompson/Ohio State University/HO)AP - Deadly epidemics. Ruined crops. The extinction of some of Africa's legendary wildlife. The potential consequences of global warming could be devastating for the world's poorest continent, yet its nations are among the least equipped to cope.



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(AP)

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Wilma a record-setter, but records scant: experts (Reuters)
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nm/20051020/environment_weather_wilma_dc
Thu, 20 Oct 2005 22:24:43 GMT
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A general view of the beach at the resort town of Cancun in Mexico's state of Quintana Roo as Hurricane Wilma approaches October 19, 2005. Described by meteorologists as potentially catastrophic, Wilma dumped rain on the Honduran coast and whipped up winds that briefly reached nearly 175 mph (280 km). (Daniel Aguilar/Reuters)Reuters - The 2005 hurricane season has spawned
three of the most intense Atlantic storms on record with
Katrina, Rita and now Wilma, fueling the debate over global
warming's impact on hurricanes.




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(Reuters)

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Greenland icecap thickens slightly despite warming (Reuters)
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Thu, 20 Oct 2005 22:22:58 GMT
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Icebergs dot coastal waters on the shores of Greenland in this view taken from an commercial airliner flying at 37,000 feet on September 2, 2004. Photo is taken just north of Godfarb on the west coast. Greenland's ice-cap has thickened in recent years despite predictions of a thaw triggered by global warming, according to a report in the journal Science on October 20, 2005. (Andy Clark/Reuters)Reuters - Greenland's ice-cap has thickened slightly
in recent years despite wide predictions of a thaw triggered by
global warming, a team of scientists said on Thursday.




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(Reuters)

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Dutch windmills at risk from climate change (Reuters)
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nm/20051020/climate_warming_netherlands_dc
Thu, 20 Oct 2005 18:07:42 GMT
Reuters - Windmills, one of the Netherlands' trademarks, may go idle because of less wind as a result of climate change, Dutch scientists predict.

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S.Africa opposed to watered down Kyoto (Reuters)
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Thu, 20 Oct 2005 14:05:57 GMT
Reuters - South Africa said on Thursday that it would staunchly oppose any moves to water down the targets laid out for developed countries under the Kyoto climate change pact at an upcoming U.N. meeting in Montreal.

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Eight states, NYC appeal global warming dismissal (Reuters)
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Wed, 19 Oct 2005 20:15:25 GMT
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Vermont Attorney General William H. Sorrell (2nd L), joined by New Jersey Attorney General Peter C. Harvey (L), Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal (2nd R) and New York Attorney General Elliot Spitzer at a press conference in New York on July 21, 2004. Eight states and the city of New York have appealed last month's dismissal of their global warming lawsuit against five of the largest U.S. utilities. (Peter Morgan/Reuters)Reuters - Eight states and the city of New York
have appealed last month's dismissal of their global warming
lawsuit against five of the largest U.S. utilities.




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(Reuters)

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States, NYC appeal global warming dismissal (Reuters)
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Wed, 19 Oct 2005 19:45:35 GMT
Reuters - Eight states and the city of New York have appealed last month's dismissal of their global warming lawsuit against five of the largest U.S. utilities.

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Top scientific group warns of growing natural disasters (AFP)
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Wed, 19 Oct 2005 12:14:11 GMT
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- Flooded roads in Louisiana after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita smashed into the US Gulf Coast. The International Council for Science warned that the world will witness more deadly natural disasters as global warming accelerates, with unchecked population growth putting large numbers of people at risk.(AFP/File/Robyn Beck)AFP - The world will witness more deadly natural disasters as global warming accelerates, with unchecked population growth putting large numbers of people at risk.



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(AFP)

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Polar regions take center stage in climate crisis (Reuters)
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nm/20051019/environment_polar_dc
Wed, 19 Oct 2005 05:02:43 GMT
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World scientists are aiming to spell out in graphic detail the threat of flooding faced by millions of people from America to Asia as global warming melts the polar ice caps. In this file photo Aerial Greenland's west coast is pictured from commercial airliner. Photo is taken just north of Godthab, or Nuuk in the local language, on the west coast. Picture taken September 2. 2004 (Andy Clark/Reuters)Reuters - World scientists are aiming to spell out
in graphic detail the threat of flooding faced by millions of
people from America to Asia as global warming melts the polar
ice caps.




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(Reuters)

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Puget Sound Region Feeling Climate Change (AP)
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ap/20051018/climate_change
Tue, 18 Oct 2005 23:53:37 GMT
AP - The Puget Sound region is feeling the impact of climate change — from flooding to warmer waters — and things could be getting worse, according to a report by University of Washington researchers.

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Expert: Warming Trends Could Plague N.M. (AP)
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ap/20051018/warming_climate
Tue, 18 Oct 2005 23:52:13 GMT
AP - Warming trends could cause more water shortages in New Mexico, a climatologist predicts. Experts point to carbon dioxide emissions at the primary cause of global warming.

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South Africa calls for new push against climate change (AFP)
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afp/20051018/safricaenvironmentclimateusaustralia
Tue, 18 Oct 2005 14:56:24 GMT
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- South Africa's Environment Minister Marthinus van Schalkwyk addresses a press conference in April 2004. South Africa called for a renewed effort to combat global warming to bring on board the United States and Australia who have rejected the Kyoto protocol.(AFP/File/Anna Zieminski)AFP - South Africa called for a renewed effort to combat global warming to bring on board the United States and Australia who have rejected the Kyoto protocol.



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(AFP)

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Bushmen's quiver tree threatened by climate change (Reuters)
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nm/20051018/environment_africa_tree_dc
Tue, 18 Oct 2005 14:35:35 GMT
Reuters - A famed desert tree used for generations by Africa's bushmen to make quivers for their arrows is threatened by global warming, a conference heard on Tuesday.

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Climate change to reduce into rice yields: IRRI (AFP)
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afp/20051018/asiariceclimate
Tue, 18 Oct 2005 13:33:11 GMT
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- A farmer plants rice in her paddy field on the outskirts of Yangshou in China's southwest Guangxi province. The International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) warned that climate change resulting from human activity is likely to lead to reduced rice yields and the problem may only be manageable if action is taken starting right now.(AFP/File/Peter Parks)AFP - Climate change resulting from human activity is likely to lead to reduced rice yields and the problem may only be manageable if action is taken starting right now, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) experts warned.



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(AFP)

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Global warming takes toll on Africa's coral reefs (Reuters)
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nm/20051018/environment_corals_dc
Tue, 18 Oct 2005 13:09:24 GMT
Reuters - Global warming is taking a toll on coral reefs off east Africa, which will likely be killed off in a few decades if sea surface temperatures continue to rise, a leading researcher warned on Tuesday.

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S.Africa govt, business to measure CO2 emissions (Reuters)
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nm/20051017/environment_safrica_emissions_dc
Mon, 17 Oct 2005 14:01:48 GMT
Reuters - South Africa's government and business signed a Memorandum of Understanding on Monday under which the private sector committed itself to monitoring greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions linked to global warming.



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